Skip to content

May 2016

Silos In Software Testing

Silos In Software Testing

Individuals might not understand what the silo effect really means. But everything is straightforward.

The silo may be the condition when concept, someone’s view and strategy are limited connection with others and by the present prejudices.

The workers of the professionals of others not associated with IT-sphere, in addition to software testing organizations, conduct their jobs in silos. That is a somewhat complex idea, plus it ought to be considered more seriously.

Silo Types

FormalĀ Silo
In most organization, you will find the categories of professionals which resolve the identified problems and perform specific duties. You will find builders, testers, product managers, sales managers, directors, etc.

Informal Silo

This kind concerns the exact same ideas, principles and requirements discussed schools or from the specific groups. Furthermore, the silo effect can also be considered when it comes to implementing for instance, the program strategy or even the robot theory, of particular assessment concepts and methods.

The silo effect has benefits and drawbacks. The advantages of the silo result in software testing area, therefore will be considered.

Silo Benefits

  • Foundation of creating the group of professionals which reveal the most popular view. It’s simpler to sort the group of like minded professionals.
  • Silos supply the combination of initiatives of each person in the test group.
  • Service systems are recognized using the support of silos.
  • Effective communication encourages inside the test group.
  • Reliability for each person in the team is set up because of silos.

All mentioned facets of silos possess the positive impact around the team spirit as well as the screening procedure. However, despite considered advantages, the silo effect has some disadvantages. It’s extremely important to avoid the adverse effects of silos.

Silo Disadvantages

  • The expert’s imagination may be limited by the silo. The tunnel vision of the checking procedure doesn’t supply performance assessment or the efficient practical testing.
  • The tribalism is caused by the silo. The enmity to another test or builders group stops the well timed creation of program or the bug-free software.
  • Problems, myths, miscommunication and issues might be developed from the silo.
  • The denial of conceptionĀ or each concept which varies from your personal ideas results in every other checking type or less effective automated testing. The appropriate propositions ought to be examined and taken into consideration.
  • The professionals can become blind to hazards due to the silo effect.

There’s an excellent line between disadvantages and the silo’s benefits. You ought to always manage their education of silo impact on the entire test group as well as every staff member.

To Update Or Not To Update- That Is The Question

to update or not to update software

Are you thinking of having your software updated? Be sure to mull it over before proceeding. We’ve compiled a list to help you think before you click “update.”

Here are some things you have to consider if you would like to update your software.

 

Who uses the software?

You have to take in consideration the number of people relying on your software,

If your software is used by multiple people, you must consider the following items:

  • Are there multiple people using your software?
  • Will this update give your users an easier or harder time getting in touch with you?
  • Is there a learning curve associated with the update? You will need to prepare ahead of time if you need to send out documentation or hold training, so your users can easily understand the updates.

Making sure the above items are covered is important, because if you make it hard for your users to interface and work with you, they may opt to look for another provider.

Watch the video attached to have an idea of what we mean.

Have you squashed enough bugs?

It is no mystery that first release software can get very buggy.

This is terribly agitating for users who just want to get things one. The following are things you have to be certain of before rolling out a release or updating right away:

  • Has the software gone through intensive quality analysis?
  • Has there been enough use cases and tests run for it?
  • If you’re still considering to still go with this update, do you have enough patience or, more importantly, bandwidth, to iron out issues that arise?
  • Have you had the software tested by other people in your organization? A general consensus from people with the same level of technical skills would help you gauge how hard or easy it is to master.

If some items above are not met, it would probably be best to have the bugs resolved before thinking of updating.

Is the new update free of compatibility issues?

Encountering compatibility issues during an update process can get frustrating.

Be sure the following items have been cleared, before you send out a release:

  • Will your software update be compatible with all devices and operating systems that the previous version was compatible with?
  • If you provide a file sharing feature, will this carry over flawlessly in the next version?
  • Are the important functions from the old version still available in the new version?
  • Perhaps one of the most important questions would be how high are the minimum computer specifications that will be able to run the latest version of your software? Would they need to upgrade computer systems? Would that upgrade be worth the investment? You would need to justify that need with solid evidence.

At the end of the day, you have the power to decide whether or not to take the next step. It is very important, however, to consider everything mentioned above for a better transition to the new software.

 

šŒ¢